Richard Dawkins Keynesianism

I am with Negri on Keynes that Keynes was “a gentleman – that is, an honest bourgeois, not a petty-bourgeois like Proudhon, or an ideologue, but an easy man”. Proudhon was a localist after all, and we all know the petty-bourgeois nature of localism and those who believe it can resist capitalism – more on this later! Not that we should confuse any of the recent attempts at government intervention and regulation with Keynesianism – of course, none of them even consider the possibility of full employment as being a necessary goal. And we certainly shouldn’t confuse Keynesianism with anti-capitalism like so many friends do. I digress.

The popular form of Keynes states that inorder to stimulate the economy in the event of one of capitalism’s systematic downturns, the government must perform more activity, creating jobs and stimulating the economy as a whole, kicking the recovery into gear. This is illustrated by an example from his masterpiece The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money:

if the Treasury were to fill old bottles with bank-notes, bury them at suitable depths in disused coal-mines which are then filled up to the surface with town rubbish, and leave it to private enterprise on well-tried principles of laissez-faire to dig the notes up again (the right to do so being obtained, of course, by tendering for leases of the note-bearing territory), there need be no more unemployment and, with the help of repercussions, the real income of the community, and its capital wealth, would probably become a good deal greater than it actually is.

The simple point was – and against those who would claim that you need to build something socially useful (though this is to the good if this is possible, because more satisfied secure people do more economic activity) – the government should do something, anything to stimulate the economy.

My premise is this then – the government should require Richard Dawkins to release yet another book of the ilk of The God Delusion – feel free to come up with your own names in the comments. The sheer stimulation of the publishing industry, both in terms of newsprint and books either refuting his claims line by line, systematically or morally, or piggy backing his claims with fresh praise, would increase the economy to an unprecedented extent. The book should be a mix of generally bad arguments (like many of those he gives in the forebear) and very good (perhaps outsourced to the best atheist philosophers of religion) and/or very subtle and convoluted arguments indeed (perhaps those that it is near impossible to decipher and are open to numerous contradictory interpretations)  that would generate far more responses at far higher level of scholarship than the rather thin dash he gives us there. Better still, he could maybe do a series of the books.

Considering this would be done in a private consultation with Dickie Dawkins, it would sneak around conservatives opposed to stimulation of the economy. Its as good idea as any – maybe they could convince him to perhaps convert to a minor and obscure religion, in order to stimulate a further flurry of publication?

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7 Responses to “Richard Dawkins Keynesianism”

  1. bat020 Says:

    Simon Munnery has a routine where he interviews Richard Dawkins (in the form of, erm, a puppet mouse) about his new book, The Love Delusion.

  2. Two Keynes Posts, One Tragic, One Comic « PHILOSOPHY IN A TIME OF ERROR Says:

    […] But, you might be thinking, what can I, private citizen and non-economist do to bring about a Keynesian-style economic stimulus? Alex as An und für sich believes it’s up to Richard Dawkins. I’ll let him explain. […]

  3. Carl Packman Says:

    The book shall be called “I can’t believe it’s not guns versus butter”

  4. Tim Morton Says:

    I think he should write Why Religion Is Lovely and let the free market decide which of his books on the subject is correct. With a picture of him winking like Paul McCartney on the cover.

  5. Adam Kotsko Says:

    Let’s assume that Keynes’s theory about burying money in the ground, etc., is true — wouldn’t this count as a pretty devestating critique of capitalism?

  6. Alex Andrews Says:

    How do you mean? Being a bit slow probably.

  7. Adam Kotsko Says:

    The fact that capitalist growth has no necessary connection with what we’d normally find to be valuable or worthwhile and can in fact be accelerated by purposely doing pointless and wasteful things.


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