Two events for Northwestern’s Paul of Tarsus Interdisciplinary Working Group

Next Monday and Tuesday, the Paul reading group at Northwestern will be hosting two talks, one by me over Agamben’s Highest Poverty and the other by Aidan Tynan over Deleuze’s relationship to Paul. Details “below the fold.”


ADAM KOTSKO, Shimer College
author of Zizek and Theology (T&T Clark, 2008), Politics of Redemption: The Social Logic of Salvation (T&T Clark, 2010), Awkwardness (Zero Books, 2010), and Why We Love of Sociopaths (Zero Books, 2012), and translator of Giorgio Agamben’s The Sacrament of Language (Stanford UP, 2010), The Highest Poverty (Stanford UP, 2013), and Opus Dei (Stanford UP, forthcoming)

will present a paper written for Northwestern’s Paul Group entitled:

“What St. Paul and the Franciscans Can Tell Us About Neoliberalism: On Agamben’s The Highest Poverty”.

Tuesday, May 21st
6-8 PM
French & Italian Seminar Room, Kresge 2-380
Northwestern University
Evanston, IL 60208

Preparatory Readings:
-Agamben, The Highest Poverty: Monastic Rules and Form-of-Life, Part I, Chapters 2-3 & all of Part III (“Rule and Law,” “Flight From the World and Constitution,” “The Discovery of Life,” “Renouncing Law,” “Highest Poverty and Use,” “Threshold”)
-Agamben, The Kingdom and the Glory: For a Theological Genealogy of Economy and Government, Section 6 (“Angelology and Bureaucracy”)

Email virgil@u.northwestern.edu if you would like a copy of any or all of these texts.

If you have time, other supplementary texts worth visiting include:
-Agamben, The Time That Remains
-Agamben, The Church and the Kingdom

https://www.facebook.com/events/290037034465741/

https://www.facebook.com/groups/paul.of.tarsus/

This event is co-sponsored by the Kaplan Institute for the Humanities, Religious Studies, and French & Italian

==================================================================

AIDAN TYNAN, Cardiff University
author of Deleuze’s Literary Clinic: Criticism and the Politics of Symptoms (Edinburgh UP, 2012)
will present a paper written for Northwestern’s Paul Group entitled:
“Belief in This World: Deleuze, Paul and the Apocalyptic Mood”.

Monday, May 20th
6-8 PM
CLS Seminar Room, Crowe 1-125
Northwestern University
Evanston, IL 60208

Abstract:
How can the philosophy of Gilles Deleuze contribute to current forms of political theology based around leftist re-evaluations of the work of Saint Paul? Deleuze, with his Nietzschean and Spinozist inheritance, would seem to be diametrically opposed to the kind of work recently produced by Zizek, Badiou and Agamben, each of whom has attempted, in different ways, to extract from Paul’s theology an account of revolutionary political agency. In this paper I argue that Deleuze develops, from his early work on Nietzsche to his collaborations with Felix Guattari and beyond, the problem of ‘belief in this world’ as a political task. Deleuze and Guattari’s political theory is based on the fact that, as they put it, ‘beliefs and desires are the basis of every society’. In Anti-Oedipus, their famous but often misunderstood polemic against psychoanalysis, they inquire into the status of an unconscious that is said to ‘believe’ rather than produce. In this sense, Deleuze and Guattari may be seen as developing the political implications of Lacan’s claim that ‘God is not dead; God is unconscious’. The task thus becomes, for Deleuze, how to believe in the world as it is, as we have made it with our desire, and not in the representations of the world as an object separate from desire. I will draw on D.H. Lawrence’s Apocalypse, which provides a Nietzschean reading of the Book of Revelation, and Deleuze’s interpretation of Lawrence’s work, in order to suggest ways in which Deleuze may contribute to a political theology for our own apocalyptic times.
Preparatory readings:
-Deleuze, Nietzsche and Philosophy, Chapters 4-5
(“From Ressentiment to the Bad Conscience” and “The Overman: Against the Dialectic”)
-Deleuze, Essays Critical and Clinical, Chapters 6 & 15
(“Nietzsche and Saint Paul, Lawrence and John of Patmos” and “To Have Done with Judgment”;
especially pp. 132-135)
-D.H. Lawrence, Apocalypse

Email virgil@u.northwestern.edu if you would like a copy of any or all of these texts.

If you have time, other supplementary texts worth visiting include:
-Deleuze, Empiricism and Subjectivity: An Essay on Hume’s Theory of Human Nature, Chapter 4
(“God and the World”)
-Deleuze, Pure Immanence, Chapter 3
(“Nietzsche”; especially pp. 80 & 96)
-Deleuze, Difference and Repetition, p. 12
-Aidan Tynan, Deleuze’s Literary Clinic, Introduction, Chapters 1 & 3
(“A Case of Thought” and “Symptoms, Repetition, and the Productive Death Instinct”)

https://www.facebook.com/events/117567565114433/

https://www.facebook.com/groups/paul.of.tarsus/

About these ads

One Response to “Two events for Northwestern’s Paul of Tarsus Interdisciplinary Working Group”

  1. Psychoanalysis, Phenomenology, Paul: May’s finale; summer’s open vista | InterCcECT Says:

    […] May, Which Way Forward for Psychoanalysis? 19-21 May, Phenomenology Roundtable 20-21 May, Paul of Tarsus Working Group presents Aidan Tynan, “Belief in This World: Deleuze, Paul and the Apocalyptic Mood” and […]


Comments are closed.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,251 other followers