InterCcECT Summer Reading Group

Totalizing, teleologizing, triadic: standard readings of Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit are monotone. In The Hegel Variations, Fredric Jameson re-encounters the rhythm and dynamism of the text, reprising the fluidity of the negative. Come tune your dialectic with InterCcECT at our first reading group of the summer, Wednesday 25 June, 12noon, Bucktown-Wicker Park Public Library Study Room.

What’s on your reading/talking/writing/making list? Email interccect at gmail to propose summer collaborations, or to request the texts.

Posted in blog posts, Chicago, Hegel, Interccect, Jameson. Comments Off

radical alternatives to radical empiricism: an InterCcECT mini seminar with Joshua Kates

From systems theory to object oriented ontology, the post-human to the multitude, empiricism and its latent historicism underlie the most orthodox (and most contentious) questions and methods in the humanities today. In Historicity and Holism,  Joshua Kates plumbs the depths of this radical empiricism, proffering an experimental absolutism as its most resourceful alternative. InterCcECT is delighted to host a mini-seminar with Professor Kates, focusing on “Radical Empiricism Revisited,” an excerpt from that project.

Join us Friday 22 November, 3pm, at our frequent host The Newberry Library, room B-91.

Contact us to request the reading.
Abstract:
“Radical Empiricism Revisited” stages a major invention in contemporary theory, by grouping together work around Deleuze, Latour, Luhmann and others as a form of empiricism inflected by Kant, and contrasting this to a more innovative and experimental relation to the absolute found in Derrida and the early Foucault. My treatment is an outgrowth of possibilities opened up by my current project, Historicity and Holism (parts of which have appeared or about to appear in differences and diacritics), as well as those I explored in my previous two books on Derrida and phenomenology, history of science, and philosophy of language.

As always, write us to propose or announce events, check out our calendar for recommendations like Hegel’s Critique of Kant,  and connect with us on Facebook for frequent links and commentary.

Renegade Aesthetics – an InterCcECT reading group

The aesthetic resistance to theory. Aesthetic indistinction. The aesthetic that theorizes itself. The sensitivities and perceptions that exceed theoretical vision. (Not) knowing it when you see it. Autonomy.

Does the new aesthetic turn adequately grapple with whether there can even be such a thing as aesthetic theory? InterCcECT is excited to host a reading group on Renegade Aesthetics led by special guest Benjamin Morgan. We’ll be tackling selections from very recent works by Steven Connor (“Doing Without Art”), Sianne Ngai (Our Aesthetic Categories), and Jacques Ranciere (Aisthesis).  Contact us (interccect at gmail) for PDFs.

Thanks to the generous partnership of The Scholl Center, we will meet Friday 9 August, 2pm, at The Newberry Library, room B92.

What are you theorizing? InterCcECT happily announces your events and eagerly receives your proposals. And don’t forget to connect with us on Facebook .

Posted in aesthetics, Chicago, Interccect. Comments Off

totality, represented: an InterCcECT reading group on Fredric Jameson

Jameson’s recent Representing Capital encounters Marx’s first volume through foregrounding the reading modes necessary to appreciate Marx’s writing modes, which are themselves not peripheral to the subject matter but essential.

Jameson writes “the central formal problem of Capital Volume I is the problem of representation: namely how to construct a totality out of individual elements, historical processes, and perspectives of all kinds; and indeed how to do justice to a totality which is not only non-empirical as a system of relationships, but which is also in full movement, in expansion, in a movement of totalization which is essential to its very existence and at the heart of its peculiar economic nature.”

Join InterCcECT for a reading of Jameson’s reading.
Friday, 28 June, 2pm
Bucktown / Wicker Park Public Library (Community Room, 2nd Floor).
1701 N Milwaukee, accessible via Blue Line Damen or Milwaukee, North, Damen, Western, and Armitage buses.

As always, we welcome your proposals at interccect @ gmail dot com, and encourage your input at our Facebook page.

Cutrofello’s objective correlatives: of Hegel and Hamlet

InterCcECT is delighted to present a talk by Andrew Cutrofello“Two Contemporary Hegelianisms,” Tuesday 19 March, 4pm, Newberry LibraryRoom B82.

Abstract:
Robert Brandom’s and Slavoj Žižek’s appropriations of Hegel seem radically different. Brandom’s Hegelianism takes the form of a semantic holism that is essentially normative and pragmatic. Žižek’s is a version of dialectical materialism that is avowedly perverse and revolutionary in intention. Curiously, however, there are significant parallels in the two philosophers’ conceptions of Hegelian spirit. These are evidenced in their respective readings of T.S. Eliot’s essay, “Tradition and the Individual Talent.” Nevertheless, Brandom’s and Žižek’s Hegels ultimately diverge with respect to the nature of reason and commitment. In my talk I will try to sketch these differences by bringing into play another of Eliot’s essays from The Sacred Wood, namely, “Hamlet and His Problems.” In this essay, Eliot develops his famous conception of the objective correlative, explaining why it goes missing in Shakespeare’s play. Brandom and Žižek, I suggest, have fundamentally different conceptions of Hegel’s “missing” objective correlative.

a few highlights from our calendar, which contains additional details:
8 March Issues in Phenomenology
13 March Gregory Flaxman at U of C
13 March Bill Martin, “Zen Maoism: An improbable Buddhist-Marxist synthesis”
15 March Paola Marrati on Deleuze

Posted in Chicago, Hegel, Interccect, Zizek. Comments Off

Lecture at Shimer College

On Monday, November 12, at 6:30, Shimer College will be hosting a lecture by Peter Temes, who will be discussing his new book The Future of the Jewish People in Five Photographs. More details are available on this poster (PDF), which is handy for e-mailing, printing, and displaying.

Posted in Chicago, Judaism, lectures, Shimer College. Comments Off

History, Fictions, and the Politics of Justice

Chicago-area folks may be interested in “History, Fictions, and the Politics of Justice”, an event in two weeks with Saba Mahmood and Mahmood Mamdani.

Mahmood’s lecture is titled “Azazeel and the Politics of Historical Fiction: Sectarian Dramas Ancient and Modern”; Mamdani’s lecture, “Beyond Nuremberg: The Historical Significance of the Post-Apartheid Transition in South Africa”.

October 25, 4pm

International House Home Room

University of Chicago

Further details here.

Red October

InterCcECT proudly presents Jodi Dean, “The Communist Horizon”  Saturday 27 October, 4:30pm, generously hosted by Gallery 400. Based on her brand new book, the talk urges us to imagine new Octobers.

*theorizing October*

(highlights from our calendar, which contains links and details):

12 Oct Laurence Hemming, “Production: Formerly This Was Called God: Heidegger in dialogue with Marx”

13 Oct Frances Ferguson, “Economic and Sentimental Reasons”

15 Oct Anthony Paul Smith, “Liberating Lived Experience: François Laruelle and the Work of NonPhilosophy”

16 Oct Michael Hardt, “The Right to the Common”

16 Oct Ramin Takloo-Bighash, “History, Theory, and Practice of Prime Numbers”

17 Oct Adam Kotsko,”Agamben on Liturgy and Politics”

17-19 Oct UIC French, “Inequality and Exclusion:The Theory and Practice of Human Rights”

18 Oct Achille Mbembe, “Notes on Fetishism and Animism”

26-28 Oct DePaul Philosophy, “Hegel and Capitalism”

29 Oct Danielle Bergeron,”Psychosis As It Is Lived”

Propose or announce your October aspirations by contacting us , and “like” us on Facebook for frequent links.

the fantasy of democracy, the desire of communism

InterCcECT is delighted to announce a lecture by Jodi Dean, “The Communist Horizon,” Saturday 27 October, presented at Gallery 400 with their generous support.  Based on her book forthcoming in late October, the talk proposes new ideals for communism today.

In preparation, InterCcECT will host a reading group on excerpts from Dean’s recent book Democracy and Other Neoliberal Fantasies, along with selections from the comrade anthology The Idea of Communism.  Join us Thursday 4 October at The Newberry Library, room B82, 3pm.  PDFs available upon request .

*this week in theory*

(highlights from our calendar, which contains additional details):

5 September Graeber’s Debt (History of Capitalism reading group)

5 September Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason (German Philosophy reading group)

6 September Leibniz’s Exoteric Philosophy (Lecture by John Whipple)

7 September “Kristeva’s Severed Heads: Sadomasochism and Sublimation” (Lecture by Kelly Oliver)

What’s on your docket? As always, write us  to propose or announce events, and “like” us on Facebook for frequent links.

Homicide cap and trade

It’s becoming clear that the Chicago Police Department’s blanket ban on gang-related homicides is no longer workable. Clearly we need to try a new approach: legalize and regulate, in the interest of harm reduction.

The first step is to provide training to registered gang members in the proper use of firearms. Too many people have died because of a lack of adequate training among gang enforcers, leading to innocents “catching strays.” The city should look to partner with the NRA and private philanthropists to build and staff a shooting range to improve the aim of at-risk youth.

Secondly, once we are assured that only gang members will be killed, we need some way to keep such homicides within tolerable levels. Here I think we need to take a hint from environmental policy: homicide cap and trade. Each registered gang would be given the opportunity to bid on permits that would constitute an annual allowance of homicides. If they do not use all their murders, they can sell the remainders to other participants in the system (which presumably would include the police department itself). Murders in excess of the particular gang’s “cap” would be prosecuted like traditional murders, and other gangs would be incentivized to cooperate with the police investigation in order to maintain their ability to legally murder people — a stark reversal of the current culture of non-cooperation that our short-sighted total murder ban has helped to produce.

In addition, gangs could earn murder-offset credits by funding after-school programs and engaging in other philanthropic activities likely to lower the murder rate in their communities.

I believe this plan would be a private-public partnership in the best sense, using market forces to regulate a behavior that traditional “Big Government” law enforcement has failed to adequately address. I urge Mayor Emanuel and the City Council to take up this proposal at their earliest convenience.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,556 other followers