Academic productivity-related program activities for the fall

This semester, I fear I may be reaching a kind of saturation point for how much it is possible to do without being in a constant state of anxiety. In addition to my regular teaching and administrative duties at Shimer, I am teaching a graduate seminar at Chicago Theological Seminary and attempting to make progress on my translation. On top of that, I have agreed to do the following:

  • Attend a conference for the Association of Core Text Colleges on secular vs. religious core curricula, as Shimer’s representative (end of this week, paper already written)
  • Give a talk on Zizek and religion at Portland State University (Monday, October 13)
  • Write a chapter on the ransom theory of the atonement for a reference volume
  • Write an essay on religion and politics for a special journal issue
  • Write two reviews on devil-related books
  • Do various editing work toward the previously mentioned co-authored essay collection on Agamben with Colby Dickinson (which I had so hoped to finalize this summer, but alas…)

As an added bonus, I need to at least get a book order ready for a new course entitled “Reading the Qur’an” and for a Shimer core course I’ve never taught before (though the beauty of the Shimer system is that I can basically carry over what was done last time, which is my general policy for teaching those courses for the first time).

All of this is a little more manageable than it might seem, because my Shimer teaching schedule is fairly convenient — I’m done with classes by 1pm MWF — and I’m teaching two sections of a course I did just last year. And of course, some of this stuff can overlap with each other and lead more or less directly into the drafting of my long-awaited devil book. I should be largely “out of the woods” by the end of October, but in the meantime, certain activities (such as blogging) are taking a back seat, though other, more procrastinatory activities (such as Twitter) may suddenly become very prominent, for a short, intense time period.

One thing I’ve dealt with a lot more this past year has been travel, both for conferences and for personal reasons. In grad school, I used to absolutely dread trips, and I think a lot of that had to do with a feeling of vulnerability related to my abject poverty, etc., in addition to a bad track record for travel in my early life (either suffocating family vacations or oppressive church stuff — or sometimes both, as when we went to “camp meeting”!). Now I seem to be approaching more normal levels of stress, which is probably ineliminable for people without the sociopatic detachment of George Clooney’s character in Up in the Air. Yet that character’s approach to travel nonetheless remains a kind of ideal for me, and as I ponder it, I wonder if it’s because he’s actually the ultimate homebody who has made the generic trappings of business travel into a kind of omnipresent home. He’s so good at travel that he effectively never travels.

Sorry: Another one of those “thinking out loud” posts

I apologize if these posts about future plans are too self-indulgent. Perhaps they could be viewed primarily as a way of coping with my own anxiety, and thus you should feel free to skip them. Hopefully there is some value, however, in seeing how I think through my long-term planning.

Read the rest of this entry »

Other summer projects

My two major projects for the summer — my Islam syllabus and Creepiness — are now basically done. There will be further work on both (continued background reading on Islam and the process of editing on Creepiness), but they will no longer require the kind of sustained effort I’ve put in so far. I had been anticipating spending all summer working on both, along with the translation of The Use of Bodies, but there have been delays on finalizing the Italian text that have meant that particular project is on pause for now.

In the meantime, I have a few things to work on. The most exciting is a collection of essays on Agamben that I’m putting together with Colby Dickinson, which will amount to a two-person edited volume. Over the next few weeks, we’ll be reading each other’s contributions (which have mostly been previously published or presented at conferences) and giving some feedback, as well as putting together a proposal. I’ve also promised a couple pieces for a reference work on the doctrine of the atonement and hope to complete at least one (the shorter one, which is due in early fall), and I need to write up a syllabus for my Theology and Politics of the Devil course at CTS (for which I’ve “assigned” myself some fresh reading). Finally, I’d like to rework my Birkbeck talk into a sample chapter for The Prince of This World and put together a prospectus for a publisher. And until I head back to Chicago, I have the weekly Agamben reading group that just started.

I guess that sounds like a lot. The problem is that no single one of them is either as lengthy (or as fun!) as Creepiness or as urgent as the Islam syllabus, so I can picture myself wasting a lot of time deciding which to do first — and then repeating the procedure when I finish whatever I finally settle on and need to move on to the next thing. Somewhat more pathetically, experience teaches me that when I don’t have an overarching project to work on during the summer, I become bored and depressed. That’s one major drawback of being such a productive person: workahol withdrawal can be harsh.

Posted in boredom, to-do lists. Comments Off

Adventures in Trying to Do Research During the Semester

My research project on the devil has been long deferred. It was immediately clear to me after finishing my dissertation that the devil theme was the most interesting aspect and worthy of its own study, and that remained my “official” position on the matter despite the fact that I was doing relatively little in the way of actual work toward that goal. I explain this partly by the vagaries of the job market — in my years as a VAP, I wasn’t sure where I was going to wind up, in the sense that I didn’t know if I’d find a job at all and I also wasn’t sure what department I’d be in. Hence I focused more on my little pop culture project, along with more occasional writings that were mostly dictated by invitations rather than any kind of systematic program. I gave myself time off from thinking about such things while finding my feet at Shimer, and then once I was through my first year, I had already committed my summer (and much of the fall, as it turns out) to my Agamben translations.

But now, dear reader — now I have actually done something. Read the rest of this entry »

I’ve seen the future, brother — it is murder

As the years go on, it increasingly seems to me that my life as an academic is characterized by two different rhythms. First and most obviously, there is the academic calendar, the “school year,” which determines my day-to-day activities. For my long-term research goals, however, the calendar year plays an increasingly important role. Summer vacation comes in the middle of this second rhythm — the first part of the calendar year consists of laying the groundwork for whatever I’m going to be doing during the summer, and the fall and winter provides space for the “mop-up work” when I inevitably don’t get as much done as I’d planned during the summer.

This year, my rhythm was dominated by the two Agamben translations, which turned out to be much more labor-intensive than I expected. Read the rest of this entry »

Progress report

We academics always have big hopes for the summer, and it is usually around this point that we are able to recognize what was realistic and what was not. My goals for this summer, outside of my Shimer-related obligations, were lofty. Read the rest of this entry »

To-do list

This week I’ve been on spring break. Though one might think that would be especially propitious for blogging, my production levels this week tell a different story, as I’ve spent much of my break either “spring cleaning” at home or getting a bit ahead of the curve on grading and class prep. Both those tasks are necessary and satisfying in their own way, but they aren’t particularly inspiring.

Yet it has inspired me to daydream about summer vacation and all the amazing things I will accomplish. Read the rest of this entry »

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